Travel

Sri Lanka 2013 : Drive to Ella

With the wedding behind us, we made our way into the heart of the Sri Lankan hill country. Our first of two stops was a little town called Ella known for its mountain treks and plantations. Since we started our journey from Mount Lavinia that lies in south Colombo, we ended up taking a route we hadn’t initially planned for. Instead of taking the Badulla road that ran along the Colombo-Badulla train track, we took the Colombo to Ratnapura route. Having taken the alternative route, we got an opportunity to see more of the country since we’d planned to take the train back which would take us through a complete different part of the hill country.

The first of the few panoramas looking south as the countryside slopes away from the road. Location unknown.

Statutory toilet stop in the hill-side region of Belihul Oya at the Belihuloya rest house next to the Belihul Oya river/stream(?).

The Belihuloya bridge right next to the rest house. Buses in SriLanka seem to follow similar rules to the ones found in India. On the upside the roads are a lot better, making them look less suicidal.

Looking south and I can’t remember where we were yet again. *hangs head in shame*

Right before we entered Haputale. Had to stop cause this was the last clear view we had since Haputale was in the clouds. This is how I remember it as with a tad over-processing that is.

After the comfortable drive to Galle and back, we’d decided to stick with Oscar (0716592509) for the rest of the trip as well. Here’s a picture of him right before we entered Haputale.

Haputale is at the southern edge of the Hill Country on a narrow mountain ridge. It was the highest point of our drive according to Oscar as we drove through the clouds before we made our descent towards Ella.

We reached Ella at around sunset midst a thunder-storm. It was brilliant and so was our little lodging and the free cake. Wishing the rain would stay away the next morning for our little trek, we slept like babies thanks to the mosquito net that were a sight for sore eyes.

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